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HBP Patient Guide

Home blood pressure monitoring One way to stay on top of how you’re doing in managing your high blood pressure is to use a home blood pressure monitor. This can be a very important tool for you and your healthcare provider to use in getting a “broader” picture of how well you’re controlling your high blood pressure. Sometimes, a healthcare provider will even recommend a home blood pressure monitor for people who are at risk for high blood pressure but haven’t been diagnosed yet. Choose a bicep monitor with an appropriately sized cuff, which will give the most accurate readings. Make sure the monitor has been tested and validated. A list of validated monitors is available here. Home monitoring can help eliminate false blood pressure readings, which happen when temporary factors affect your blood pressure, and can help give a more reliable picture of how your blood pressure is being managed to you and your healthcare provider. Medications Take a short quiz on what you’ve learned so far. Click here to begin… For many people, making changes to diet and lifestyle doesn’t do enough to lower blood pressure to a healthy range. Fortunately, there are many medications that can help. They each work in different ways to help lower your blood pressure. Not all blood pressure medications work the same way for everyone, so you and your healthcare provider may need to work together to try different medications until you find the best one for you. Other high blood pressure medications nnDiuretics: Often the first medication tried with a person newly diagnosed high blood pressure, diuretics work by removing excess salt and water from your body, which is passed through urine. Diuretics are enough for some people, but others need more help to lower blood pressure to a healthy range. In these cases, a healthcare provider may prescribe an additional medication or a medication that contains a diuretic and an additional medication. Diuretics can have side effects. These can include reduced potassium in the body (which can be supplemented), increased blood sugar levels (a potential problem for diabetics), and in some cases, flare-ups of gout or impotence. 13


HBP Patient Guide
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